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When talking about stress, dr. Altaf Husain tells us, ‘if they keep focusing on pleasing Allah, all the other doors will take care of themselves.’ Stressing too much can lead to getting stuck in this vicious circle. Time spend stressing should be spent studying and making du’a’. This topic leads us to the issue of social media concerning our mental health. We are seeking acknowledgment via social media, basing our happiness on what others think about us. Husain calls for a social media diet: social media is, and can be an ongoing interruption for us to realize who we are. Other issues, such as self-esteem and depression, are discussed.

Moreover, he talks about his study with Somali refugees in the US during the ‘2000s and Syrian refugees in Europe. He advises how to deal with micro-aggressions while living in Islamophobic areas. At last, he tells us about how to value happiness. One of the life lessons he endowed upon is that it is okay to be entertained, but it not the goal. Besides, he stresses us to think about our akhirah, which is much more valuable to us.

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From a young age, Said Hamdioui would disassemble the radio’s of his father: he was fascinated by how mechanisms operated. His academic career started in Oujda (Morocco) at the École supérieure de technologie, however, his involvement in the politically inspired student union UNEM got him into a lot of trouble, which forced him to leave the university. His journey continued in the Netherlands, where he had to start from zero. He tells us how he had to translate every word in his books at the beginning of his studies here. However, his determination made him successful. He graduated cum laude, not only for his master’s degree but also for his doctoral research. He was determined to become an engineer. Although he has come to love his life in the Netherlands, his heart will always belong to his fatherland. ‘The software may be anything, but the hardware always stays Moroccan’, he says.